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Featured Officer

Sergeant Heather Debassige / Police Officer Profile
Sgt. Debassige started her policing career in 1992. Heather was hired to police in her home community when it was still known as West Bay and before the incorporation of the UCCM Police Service.  Sgt. Debassige recalls that she and her family were living and working in Sudbury.  It was one of her sisters who first talked to her about the job opportunity and until then she hadn’t really considered a career in policing!  Not one to back away from new experiences Heather applied and hasn’t looked back since! Reflecting on her early years as an Officer, she says “There are things you learn in school, but there is more you learn once you are on the job” referring to working the roads and being one of only a few on Manitoulin who had training in conducting sexual assault investigations.  Heather credits strong professional relationships with local OPP Officers in guiding her as a rookie and a loving supportive family in achieving balance in policing. Sgt. Debassige says “I never want to see anyone fall behind and I’ve always wanted to help”and this is evident in the career choices she has made over the years.  In 2008, Heather took the Senior Police Administration course and in 2012 took the Sergeants promotional exam, earning the promotion in 2014 on a full time basis. When asked how policing has changed over the years she states that the criteria to become an Officer is more rigorous now. Upon further reflection, Heather notes that the concept of community policing is coming full circle in particular more proactive effort versus reactive response.  Heather also finds it interesting when working with new recruits and seeing the how they grow and develop as Officers, she thinks about others who  she started working with and have now gone on to retire…balancing the new with the experienced and yet knowing you are part of a team! Heather is motivated by change, she enjoys the complexities of her work noting “This is not a place where you are doing the same thing every day – it is never the same”.  She also gets satisfaction from the work on major cases and sexual assaults, seeing how the service has grown and she herself has advanced in the ranks. “Policing is always going to be part of our communities and we all need to work together” Sgt. H. Debassige
Police Officer Profile – First Class Constable Dave Mack
Cst. Mack knew as a young lad in Grades 3 and 4 that he wanted to be a Police Officer, strongly influenced by family members who were also Policemen. He says that this vision for his future never wavered even through the high school and post-secondary years. Cst. Mack, originally from M’Chigeeng First Nation, has been working in law enforcement since 1994, starting his career with Metro Toronto Police and the South Simcoe Police Service working a as part time Court Officer, full time Parking Enforcement Officer then became a sworn Police Constable in December 1997. Cst Mack started working for UCCM in 2005. He has extensive training in Major Case Management, Search Warrants, General Investigative Training, Street Drug Awareness, Scene Collision Investigation, Traffic Generalist, Scenes of Crime Officers, Policing & Diversity, Speed Measuring Radar, Investigative Interviewing & Interrogation Techniques, Sexual Assault Investigation, Homicide Investigations, and Aboriginal Gang Reduction Strategies.  Cst. Mack is interested in seeing First Nation Police Services achieve equality standards that other Ontarians have access to.  Dave would also like to devote time to some of our services cold cases and continue to learn more about trauma informed approaches to helping. A milestone for his career and personal life was the decision to return to Mnidoo Mnising, to work in the communities and share the full spectrum of his experiences with others. Dave is motivated by the people in the communities he gets to work with, striving to solve problems and help people resolve issues stating “it’s not all about convictions”. Cst. Mack likes that in policing you need to be a jack of all trades, it is not cut and dry – you need to consider everything. He says “if people learn or curb their behaviour through other means like life lessons, and not only strict enforcement, i.e. getting a ticket, then I’ve achieved my goal”.  He says that it is a good feeling when you are recognized for your knowledge in policing but the challenge is balancing work and home life. A final message Dave would like to share is…”Don’t be afraid of us…sometimes we may have our game face on because of sensitive tasks that need to be done, and that’s what is going through our minds…it’s not that we are being unfriendly, we are here for our people”. January 31, 2017
Freedom of Information Act
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